Advanced Hearing Solutions

Hope beyond hearing aids

About 38 million people in the U.S. have a significant hearing loss.1 In fact, hearing loss is such a common condition among seniors that only arthritis and hypertension affect more people.2 While hearing aids can help the majority of people with hearing loss, for some, hearing aids are not enough. But there is good news for those who no longer receive benefit from hearing aids - cochlear implants and direct bone conduction systems can provide hope when hearing aids are no longer enough and are typically covered by Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance.

Cochlear Implants 
  • For adults, age 18 and older, who have moderate-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss in both ears, and who have demonstrated limited benefit from wearing hearing aids in both ears.

  • For children 12-24 months with profound hearing loss in both ears and children 2-17 years with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss in both ears, and who have demonstrated limited benefit from wearing hearing aids in both ears.
Direct Bone Conduction 
  • For adults and children (over age 5) with single sided deafness (SSD), mixed or conductive hearing loss. However, children under the age of 5 may be fitted with a direct bone conduction system with a Softband attachment.

The information contained on this website is for informational purposes and is not intended to replace medical advice. Please consult a hearing healthcare professional.

References: 1. Center for Hearing and Communication. Facts About Hearing Loss. Available from http://www.chchearing.org/about-hearing-loss/facts-about-hearing-loss. Accessed February 2012. 2. University of California, San Francisco. Facts on Hearing Loss. Available from http://neurosurgery.ucsf.edu/index.php/brain_tumor_center_hearing_loss.html. Accessed February 2012.